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Brian McCallion

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My first experience with an "inverted yield curve" was in 2000 just prior to the tech bubble bursting. I was working on a financial portal for an investment bank and one of the charts was a yield curve. It looked odd all of a sudden, so I looked it up in a book of financial terms. An inverted yield is indicated when interest rates for short-term capital are higher than interest rates for long-term capital. In other words, people are willing to pay a significant price to alleviate short-term concerns because they're focused on the now and not so concerned about one year, three years, five years, or thirty years from now. Inverted yield curves some believe signal disruption in financial markets. On the surface, Cloud First seems to signal the disruption that is cloud computing. To take this metaphor a little further, this inversion of Cloud First from "Cloud Never" su... (more)

First of Five Enterprise Lessons Learned in the AWS Virtual Private Cloud

Public Cloud is cool and it's the only kind of Cloud my company works with. Yet enterprise financial services firms and others require controlled access. And in 2013 AWS not only won the contract to build an actual Private Cloud for the CIA (any further legal maneuvers from IBM notwithstanding), but AWS also seems to have conceded that Virtual Private Cloud is a first class AWS Cloud offering. It's not that VPC was ignored, it's just than in 2011 and most of 2012 new capabilities of the Oracle Relational Database Service (RDS) were available first in EC2, then VPC. The customers ... (more)

The Difference Between Public and Private Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has essentially been private from the beginning. Google, for one, demonstrates that the world's most successful search engine runs not on an IBM Power, Sun Enterprise, or other massively powerful machine engineered for business by the go-to-vendors for computer solutions. More in keeping with its democratic, spare, and ubiquitous, engineering ethos Google created a "cloud" of white box computer - throw-away hardware servers running Linux. Rather than purchase software box-software or hire a large consulting firm to design and build the infrastructure, Google enginee... (more)

What Motivates Open Standards in the Cloud?

Open standards are a nice idea. And democracy is a great idea too, all citizens can vote, yet we only have two real parties representing us. Similarly, I think that standards start out as a good idea, yet over time may start to become ineffective. For the most part standards committees never actually complete a standard, and the industry starts working from a "draft." In the Cloud I think standards should be less important to the subscriber than the actual capabilities. I recognize that nobody choosing a Cloud platform "wants" lock-in, or a proprietary system, yet at the same tim... (more)

Microsoft's Strong Technology in the Cloud

Are APIs the New Black?   I've been further researching the platform / web services ecosystem. It is an interesting area bc it seems the intellectual property questions are still being articulated. It also seems that few firms are aware of the issues, let alone understand how this area of concern could deeply impact their business. On the one hand firms like Tata and Eucalyptus clone the Amazon AWS apis and use them for their own clouds. On the other the Federal Reserve FRED web svc api clearly asserts IP rights wrt to public web svc apis for FRED? Is Amazon AWS simply waiting ... (more)